Thanksgiving Deviled Eggs

November 22, 2020 (Last Updated: January 10, 2021)

These Thanksgiving deviled eggs are sprinkled with surprising spices that give them a smokey, Autumn zing! Nutmeg and smoked Spanish paprika put a Fall twist on this colorful, creative appetizer recipe that everyone will love!

They’re also garnished with tiny capers and Japanese maple leaves that make them the prettiest appetizers at the party!

A deviled egg garnished with capers, a single leaf, and sprinkle of spices in front of 3 others on a marble plate.

I’ve never used nutmeg in deviled eggs before, and I’m so happy I gave it a try! Just a teeny bit goes a long way. It’s such a surprising and delightful little flavor to put in a deviled egg!

I’ve put everything on deviled eggs from bacon roses to mustard caviar to sprigs of dill, but this one little spice really gives these deviled eggs an original flair!

The garnish of capers was also a yummy choice I haven’t tried before! Nice and salty with a rich, pickley flavor and fun popping texture.

A Few Tips!

1. Don’t fill the eggs until a half-hour (or less) before serving.

You really want to fill them as close to party-time as possible for maximum prettiness, as they will start to dry out after about a half-hour. I highly suggest slicing your eggs, then placing them in a sealed container in the fridge. Then, make your filling and add it to a bag (or pastry piping bag), seal it with twisty-ties and don’t fill the egg whites until just before guests arrive.

2. A pastry piping bag makes deviled eggs extra pretty!

Always use a pastry piping bag and a pretty tip. It really makes your eggs look so much more professional.

3. Never garnish deviled eggs with spices by sprinkling directly from the container.

When garnishing with a spice, pour a bit into your hand first and use your fingers to gently sprinkle. Otherwise, if you pour directly from the bottle, it’s very likely too much will come out at once, and you’ll end up with a deviled, over-spiced heart break.

Fingers holding a deviled egg garnished with capers and a small maple leaf.

A Few Common Questions:

1. Are maple leaves edible?

Yes they are! Just be sure to wash them, and use tiny ones. 

2. How do I transport deviled eggs?

You can make your deviled eggs and use a well -washed, plastic egg container (with no paper inside) to transport them, then use a spoon to carefully remove them once you get to your destination, but I find this method a little wrought to uncertainty. One little bump or jump in the car, and they can get messy.

My preferred method is to first slice my eggs and make the filling. Then, I place the egg whites in a washed plastic container, then add the filling to a pastry piping bag with a tip. I seal both ends of the bag with twisty ties, and when I get to my destination, I simply remove the egg whites from the container, remove the twisty-ties and fill them in the kitchen.

3. How do I prevent the eggs from tipping over or sliding around on the plate?

Here are 2 solutions: First, don’t slice your eggs longways, slice them through the center with the egg standing up, then slice a tiny bit off the bottom to make a nice, flat base. You’ll find directions below for this method.

Second, you can put a tiny dot of filling under your deviled eggs to prevent them from sliding around. It will work like a tasty glue that keeps them nice and still.

How to Make Thanksgiving Deviled Eggs – Step by Step

A collage of 4 numbered images showing how to boil, peel and slice deviled eggs.

1. Add 6 large eggs to a pot of cool water, then place them on the stove and boil them for 20 minutes. Once boiled, place them in a bowl of cold water for 5 minutes. Refrigerate for 20-30 minutes.

2. Once the eggs are cool, remove the shells by carefully tapping around the center and peeling. Crack and peel very carefully so the egg is pristine and free of tears and dents.

3. Slice the eggs. I slice through the center-middle, as opposed to longways. I find the egg-halves have a more sturdy base when cut this way. Carefully remove the yokes and place them in a bowl. They’ll almost always slide out if you’re gentle, so you don’t have you use a spoon. You may sometimes have a little left over, but it’s easier and less damaging to the egg white to try sliding first.

4. Slice a tiny bit off the bottom so your deviled eggs sit perfectly flat. This will prevent them from sliding around the plate.

2 numbered images. One showing how to push yokes through a mesh strainer, the other, how to mix filling.

5. Push the yokes through a mesh strainer. This will break up the yokes and ensure that your filling is perfectly smooth when you mix in your other ingredients.

6. In a small mixing bowl, mix your egg yokes, 1 tbsp. of mayo, 1 tbsp. of mustard and 1 tsp. creamy horseradish. Add ⅛ tsp. nutmeg, salt and pepper. 

NOTE: The measurements of mayo, sour cream and mustard are purposely on on the light side so you can customize your texture until perfect. Your consistency should be similar to hummus so give it a taste, and see which condiment you would like to make it a bit more creamy.

When ready, fill your lovely deviled eggs, place a small maple leaf on the side, small capers around the edge and sprinkle with smoked paprika.

Capers and a small leaf on the edge of a deviled egg.

I hope you and your guests love these Thanksgiving deviled eggs as much as I do!

Help Yourself to a Little More Thanksgiving Recipe Inspiration

And for even more inspiration, follow me on INSTAGRAM @shekeepsalovelyhome, on PINTEREST and FACEBOOK! And if you ever make any of my tasty drinks or treats, take a picture and tag me. I want to see!

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A deviled egg garnished with capers, a single leaf, and sprinkle of spices on a marble plate.
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4.34 from 6 votes

Thanksgiving Deviled Eggs

These deviled eggs have a surprising spice that adds a delightful fall flavor: nutmeg. Not a typical deviled egg spice, which makes it just as interesting as delicious!
Prep Time20 mins
Cook Time20 mins
Cooling Time30 mins
Total Time1 hr 10 mins
Course: Appetizer
Cuisine: International
Keyword: thanksgiving deviled eggs
Servings: 12 deviled eggs
Calories: 41kcal

Equipment

  • pot to boil 6 eggs
  • Cutting board and sharp knife
  • Small mixing bowl
  • mesh strainer
  • Pastry-piping bag and tip

Ingredients

  • 6 large eggs
  • 1 tbsp. mayo
  • 1 tsp. spicy brown mustard
  • 1 tsp. creamy horseradish
  • tsp. nutmeg
  • smoked paprika - just a sprinkle
  • salt & pepper - to taste
  • 1 tbsp. capers - for garnish
  • Japanese maple leaves - optional for garnish

Instructions

  • Add 6 large eggs to a pot of cool water, then place them on the stove and boil them for 20 minutes. Once boiled, place them in a bowl of cold water for 5 minutes. Refrigerate for 20-30 minutes.
  • Once the eggs are cool, remove the shells by carefully tapping around the center and peeling. Crack and peel very carefully so the egg is pristine and free of tears and dents.
  • Carefully remove the yokes and place them in a bowl. They’ll almost always slide out if you’re gentle, so you don’t have you use a spoon. You may sometimes have a little left over, but it’s easier and less damaging to the egg white to try sliding first.
  • Slice the eggs. I slice through the center-middle, as opposed to longways. I find the egg-halves have a more sturdy base when cut this way. Carefully remove the yokes and place them in a bowl. They’ll almost always slide out if you’re gentle, so you don’t have you use a spoon. You may sometimes have a little left over, but it’s easier and less damaging to the egg white to try sliding first.
  • Slice a tiny bit off the bottom so your deviled eggs sit perfectly flat. This will prevent them from sliding around the plate.
  • In a small mixing bowl, mix your egg yokes, 1 tbsp. of mayo, 1 tbsp. of mustard and 1 tsp. creamy horseradish. Add ⅛ tsp. nutmeg, salt and pepper. When ready, fill your lovely deviled eggs, place a small maple leaf on the side, small capers around the edge and sprinkle with smoked paprika.

Notes

The measurements of mayo, sour cream and mustard are purposely on on the light side so you can customize your texture until perfect. Your consistency should be similar to hummus so give it a taste, and see which condiment you would like to make it a bit more creamy.
Nutrition information is an estimate.

Nutrition

Serving: 1Deviled Egg | Calories: 41kcal | Carbohydrates: 1g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 3g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 82mg | Sodium: 80mg | Potassium: 30mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin A: 119IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 12mg | Iron: 1mg

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3 Comments

  • Reply
    Alice
    December 19, 2020 at 9:42 am

    4 stars
    Fresh eggs work just fine. You need to steam them for about 15 minutes and then put them in cold water or ice water. The shells will come off VERY easily. I have used this method numerous times with very fresh eggs. Secondly, NEVER ever put the prepared eggs back in that carton they came in. There is high risk of cross contamination. There are egg plates with indentions for serving them.

  • Reply
    Melanie Sakowski
    September 21, 2020 at 9:56 pm

    5 stars
    Genevieve, this flavour pairing is intricate, unconventional and intriguing- cool creativity I just instinctively grated nutmeg on my eggs that I’ve been enjoying with some vanilla extract and found your recipe after deciding to look up the combo from curiosity and I’m big impressed because I can see how these all match together!

    • Reply
      Genevieve Morrison
      September 22, 2020 at 1:01 am

      Thank you so much, Melanie! I was amazed too! So glad you enjoyed it! xoxo

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